Whoever said June was quiet?

Less than a week into June, unseasonably strong winds started up. The hope was that would bring about seabirds from Hill Head, but as ever it turned into disappointment. However, reports from slightly further afield were more enticing, so Dave Wallace and I spent the afternoon of 6th at Hengistbury Head in Dorset. Our target: European storm petrel. Initially, we tried viewing from Mudeford Quay but by the time we arrived the birds were distant and we were never 100% sure whether we’d seem them. Thankfully another birder informed us that the views were reportedly better from Hengistbury, so it was worth a try. The views from Hengistbury were indeed better – superb! 5 or more storm petrels not that far offshore, provided us with excellent scope views as they lingered.    

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One of at least five Storm Petrels off Hengistbury Head, 6th June 2017

A text on 7th informed us that Andy Johnson had found an elegant tern at Sandy Point, Hayling Island; a colour ringed individual from France. Dave Ryves and I dashed down, but alas the bird departed before we, or indeed many others, were able to arrive. It teased us again with a brief appearance on the evening of 9th, but flew east and wasn’t relocated. While many birders were out the following morning (10th) searching Hayling Island and Sussex for the tern, I’d decided to start on patch, partly to sort through the moth trap we’d run the night before. While there a lovely summer plumage ruff dropped into the harbour and proceeded to display to the turnstones, and a stunning summer plumage cattle egret was present on the reserve. Satisfactory morning had, I was just heading back for lunch when a text came through “Elegant Tern at Church Norton…now” – ahh!

A few quick phone calls later, Dave and Sandie Wallace and I were on route hoping this time the bird would linger, although aware that by now, the bird hadn’t been seen (again) in some time. Thankfully by the time we arrived, the bird had been refound, occasionally showing on Tern Island – yay! It appeared just as we arrived, before flying west out of the harbour. While many successful Hampshire birders decided it was time to head to Hayling, we stayed put hoping for better views should it return. It paid off when an hour later the words “it’s on the spit!” were shouted, and there it was – the elegant tern showing well! My 300th bird in Britain.

Elegant Tern Sussex

Elegant Tern “bird C”, Church Norton, 10th June 2017

Another day, another twitch, or so it seemed, but in many ways it makes sense to make the most of close by rarities. This time, a red-footed falcon just over the border at Frensham Common, Surrey on 11th. The bird hadn’t been seen in a while when Dave and I arrived, but it soon reappeared and showed well, perching on near by trees. It’s a species I’d always wanted to see so was chuffed when one turned up locally, even if it was a mile or two outside of Hampshire.

Red-footed Falcon 11th Junw 2016 Frensham Common

Red-footed Falcon (1s male), Frensham Common, 11th June 2017

Back on patch for a brief visit on 12th, I began by checking the scrapes where a sand martin had joined with the swifts hunting insects over the water. I suppose it could well be a returning bird, the first of many as ‘autumn’ migration is only just round the corner. two tufted ducks on the river were another slightly unusual sighting for mid June here. After a quick wander up the east side, I began to head back along the boardwalk ready for lunch when a song caught my ear. Wow! I couldn’t quite believe my ears – Marsh warbler and what an impressive songster indeed! It was helpful that Andy Johnson, among others, was able to come over and confirm my suspicions. The bird was very elusive with only fleeting glimpses obtained, but so lovely to listen to, and another lifer for me!

A few other noteworthy sightings from short trips to patch include returning teal and redshank, appearances of common and green sandpipers, a couple of eider and varying size flocks of common scoter offshore. Avocets have been successful again this year, and hopefully the common terns will too. Away from birds, I’ve tried to take more note of other organisms, including the longhorn beetles where Richard Carpenter and I noted 3 species along one small stretch of the canal path: golden-bloomed grey, fairy-ringed and tawny; the latter, a red data book species. I haven’t spent nearly as much time on patch this year, for various reasons, but try to make the most of it when I am there.

Finally, I thought it was worth finishing with some moths again. Putting much more effort into moth trapping this year, and it is yielding results, both at home and on patch. Patch is of course allowing me to get to grips with some of the specialist wetland species, while the garden trap is still proving interesting, and I’ve been amazed to catch 214 species in 4 months in the garden alone! Highlights of late from the garden include Small Marbled, Anasia innoxlla, Evergestis limbata and Lozotaeniodes formosana, while on patch, my overall highlight so far has been Stathmopoda pedella. 

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Stathmopoda pedella, Titchfield Haven, 19th June 2017

So maybe June is quiet compared with the likes of spring and autumn, but this June (and indeed previous ones) turned out to be pretty good I’d say. And of course, June in amongst a seabird colony – the scrapes on patch being one – is far from quiet! 😉

 

 

 

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